Bull Meechum Essay

Bull Meechum Essay-78
series that will examine films from the 1970′s and 1980’s that were either forgotten, undervalued or misunderstood at the time of their release, but now seen in a far better light by critics and/or an acclaimed work that expanded on an eulogy given for his own father, one that bluntly asserted that “the children of fighter pilots tell different stories than other kids do.” But unexpectedly, and with little initial fanfare, it gave celebrated actor Robert Duvall one of the best roles of his career, one that brought him an Academy Award nomination in the year that Robert De Niro prevailed for Duvall’s electrifying macho turn as “Bull Meechum”, a marine-training pilot, who works out of Beauford, South Carolina in 1962 is a wholly charismatic portrayal that play’s to the actor’s strengths.

series that will examine films from the 1970′s and 1980’s that were either forgotten, undervalued or misunderstood at the time of their release, but now seen in a far better light by critics and/or an acclaimed work that expanded on an eulogy given for his own father, one that bluntly asserted that “the children of fighter pilots tell different stories than other kids do.” But unexpectedly, and with little initial fanfare, it gave celebrated actor Robert Duvall one of the best roles of his career, one that brought him an Academy Award nomination in the year that Robert De Niro prevailed for Duvall’s electrifying macho turn as “Bull Meechum”, a marine-training pilot, who works out of Beauford, South Carolina in 1962 is a wholly charismatic portrayal that play’s to the actor’s strengths.Meechum’s war-time sensibility is hardly attuned to peace time domesticity, and with a ferocious rage he treats the members of his family as if they were recruits for an exacting even oppressive commando training.

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Conroy purposely focused some of his attention on the racial problems of the south that were all around him in his formative years, and of how injustice was an outgrowth of sustained hate and prejudice.

The friendship with Toomer, and the tragic event are all part of the coming-age process that script writer and director Carlino transcribes from Conroy’s autobiographical work.

Cinematographer Ralph Woolsey effectively captures the 60’s time period with muted hues and some dreamy nostalgic textures that allow for the drama to play out with potent close ups and mid-range framing.

This allows for the potent script that Carlino penned with Herman Raucher and the fireworks generated by Duvall and O’Keefe to hold center stage.

aims straight for the heart with it’s story of emotional dislocation and a family torn asunder by tyrannical expectations.

It’s an unqualified triumph for Duvall, O’ Keefe, Danner, Bernstein, and Carlino, who brought an intimate coming-of-age story with personal and social themes in such a manner as to induce shattered viewers to believe what transpired during the film’s running time really mattered, and who collaborated to make an impressive novel a great film.

Yet, he’s an inveterate drinker and practical joker, one who’s as adverse to protocol as he is for strict enforcement of rules in the dictatorial management of his household.

But Bull Meachum is no kin to the inhuman characters portrayed by Lee Emery in He’s painted by Conroy and director Lewis John Carlino as a larger-than-life mountain of hubris and twisted priority, a flawed character whose inner sensitivity is hidden behind a facade of misguided self-assurance and inflated bravado, one who calls everyone “sports fan,” issues “direct orders” and fully expects to be addressed as “Sir” at all times.

When Bull arrives at the scene to reprimand his son for getting involved in the racial skirmishes by moving to aid Toomer, he finds the young black man lying dead in the front seat of Ben’s car, and must break the news to a stricken Arabelle.

The Pettus family, who represent the uneducated poor white families who propagate racism to feel higher on the pecking order, recalls the Ewells, the white trash family responsible for the tragic death of Tom Robinson in Harper Lee’s and the Robert Mulligan film based on it.

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